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What is Vitamin D:


Vitamin D, a fat soluble vitamin, is believed to be a hormone due to the various systems & functions in the body that it affects. A hormone is a regulatory substance produced in an organism which is transported in tissue fluids, such as blood, to stimulate specific cells or tissues into action.

"Vitamin D is unlike other micronutrients in that its main mechanism of action is to affect how genes are expressed. It does so by attaching to vitamin D receptors throughout the body. Over 200 genes are regulated by vitamin D, and at least 35 tissues in the body have vitamin D receptors, which explains its many diverse biological roles." https://www.spectracell.com

Where does it come from:

Vitamin D comes from two sources.

1. Endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight.

In the circulation, vitamin D is metabolized to 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-D) by the liver. 25-D is further metabolized by the kidney to produce the biologically-active form of vitamin D, 1, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D (1, 25-D).

2. Exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements.

Food sources of Vitamin D:

Cod Liver Oil

Salmon

Tuna

Sardines

Liver

Eggs

Nutritional supplementation:

Nutritional supplements are unfortunately often needed to achieve an optimal level of Vitamin D. As you can see from the food list above, Vitamin D rich foods are not as commonly eaten as other foods, especially not in the quantities need for optimal Vitamin D status. I do however always encourage obtaining your nutrients from God given food when and where you can!

What causes Vitamin D Deficiency:

1. Lack of sun exposure and sunscreen.

Using sunscreen with SPF as low as 15 reduces the rate of vitamin D production by 99.9%.

2. Pollution

"Inadequate radiation or insufficient cutaneous absorption of UVB is one of the cardinal causes of vitamin D deficiency. We found that living in a polluted area plays a significant independent role in vitamin D deficiency and hence, residence can be one of the main reasons of vitamin D status of the women." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20799984

Texas Commission on Enviromental Quality.

3. Skin, Liver & Kidneys

Vitamin D is produced in the skin and metabolized in the liver & kidneys, therfore if these organs are affected by a disease it can cause a deficiency. The age of these organs also affects their function.

4. Gastrointestinal Tract

Diseases of the GI Tract can affect nutrient production and absorption (Vitamin D is fat soluble). Crohn's disease and Celiac disease are just two diseases that are known to negatively affect the intestines ablity to absorb nutrients from the food you eat.

Symptoms of Deficiency:

1. Fatigue, Weakness, Exhaustion.

2. Back Pain & Arthritis.

3. Mood (Depression & Anixety).

4. Poor Bone Health (fractures).

5. Weakened Immune System.

Vitamin D wheel   1 page

Vitamin D Intake:

It is my clinical observation and opinion that a greater level than the RDA is necessary to achive an optimal level of Vitamin D. However, this infomation is no replacement for testing and the guidance of a licensed health care provider. We strongly recomend doing a blood test to establish and monitor your Vitamin D level.

In an article from The National Institute of Health the RDA for Vitamin D is:

NIH   RDA   Vitamin D

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

The same artice also states the Tolerable Intake is much greater than the RDA:NIH   Tolerable Upper Intake Levels of Vitamin D

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for both calcium and vitamin D from the Institute of Medicine of The National Academies:

National Academies   Calcium and Vitamin D recomendations

Optimal Levels:

We always recommend performing a blood test to establish and monitor your Vitamin D level.

vitamin D Levels chart

Warning: The above infomation is no replacement for testing and the guidance of a licensed health care provider. We strongly recomend doing a blood test to establish and monitor your Vitamin D level.

http://www.mercola.com/article/vitamin-d-resources.htm

Vitamin D Supplement information here:

E Health Pro




E-Health Pro, our Certified Practitioner Webstore


Refrences:

https://www.spectracell.com

https://draxe.com/vitamin-d-deficiency/


https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/


https://www.vitamindcouncil.org


http://www.mercola.com/article/vitamin-d-resources.htm



https://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/vitamin-d/

http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/Reports/2010/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-for-Calcium-and-Vitamin-D/DRI-Values.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20799984

The information in this article should not and is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional. This article is not intended as medical advice or to replace the medical advice of your health care provider.

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